Top 30 Heisman Trophy Award Candidates through Week 14 (#30 through #26)

Photo Credit: UW Dawg Pound (featured image), CBS Sports (team logos)

30. aub Kamryn Pettway, Running Back, #14 Auburn Tigers (8-4)
  • Statistics: 185 rush attempts, 1,123 rushing yards, 7 rushing touchdowns, 2 receptions, 14 receiving yards
  • Analysis: Kamryn Pettway only played in eight games this past season, but that did not stop him from rushing for 1,123 yards on just 185 carries despite playing against tough defenses from teams in the SEC. Pettway played like the powerful back he is and rumbled over opposing defenses en route to a really good statistical season in the running game despite only playing in eight games. What he did in his limited time on the playing field this season should grab the attention of the Heisman Trophy award voters.
29. wisc Corey Clement, Running Back, #8 Wisconsin Badgers (10-3)
  • Statistics: 292 rush attempts, 1,304 rushing yards, 14 rushing touchdowns, 10 receptions, 104 receiving yards, 0/1 (0% completion percentage), 2 punt returns, 28 punt return yards, 1 kickoff return, 4 kickoff return yards, 1 assisted tackle, 1 total tackle
  • Analysis: Corey Clement carried the load for the Wisconsin offense all season long as the team struggled to find their way through the passing attack. He did a very good job of it despite being limited to only 4.5 yards per carry, but much of that low yards per carry number had to do with the fact that opposing defenses were expecting running plays from the Badgers’ offense, which stems as a result of their unstable quarterback situation. Clement’s production this season is enough to put him on this list of Heisman Trophy award candidates who deserve to at least be discussed among the best players in the country.
28. wash John Ross, Wide Receiver, #4 Washington Huskies (12-1)
  • Statistics: 76 receptions, 1,122 receiving yards, 17 receiving touchdowns, 8 rush attempts, 102 rushing yards, 1 rushing touchdown, 14 kickoff returns, 364 kickoff return yards, 1 kickoff return touchdown
  • Analysis: John Ross was one of the most explosive wide receivers in the NCAA this past season, and he played a huge role in leading the Washington Huskies to their first ever College Football Playoff. His 17 receiving touchdowns were tied for 2nd most among all NCAA players, and the fact that he was such an electrifying kickoff returner that kickers aimed to keep away from add to the evidence of just how explosive he is and why he should not go without some consideration of getting a few points in the Heisman Trophy award vote.
27. colo Phillip Lindsay, Running Back, #10 Colorado Buffaloes (10-3)
  • Statistics: 230 rush attempts, 1,189 rushing yards, 16 rushing touchdowns, 47 receptions, 390 receiving yards, 1 receiving touchdown, 2 kickoff returns, 74 kickoff return yards, 1 solo tackle, 1 total tackle
  • Analysis: Phillip Lindsay was an extremely productive running back who was a huge reason that the Buffaloes were able to pull off the turnaround that they did this season. His ability to pound the ball against defenses is reflected in his 16 rushing touchdowns, which are tied for 7th most in the nation among running backs, and his ability to catch several passes per game make him one of the most versatile running backs in the sport, a huge reason why his name should come up in the Heisman Trophy award discussion.
26. wash Myles Gaskin, Running Back, #4 Washington Huskies (12-1)
  • Statistics: 227 rush attempts, 1,339 rushing yards, 10 rushing touchdowns, 14 receptions, 97 receiving yards, 1 receiving touchdown
  • Analysis: Myles Gaskin had a very productive year as the starting running back of the Huskies, and he played a huge role in leading them to their first ever appearance in the College Football Playoff. He was an efficient ball carrier who could catch a pass or two here or there, although his focus was primarily the ground game. He won’t be a serious contender for the Heisman Trophy award, but he may be mentioned once or twice.

 

-Asher Fair

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